Touchscreen table computer SUR40 starts preorders

first_imgFor commercial use, this is designed for business areas that draw upon customer and parftner engagement—offices, conference rooms, classrooms, showrooms, restaurants, retail shops, bars. Microsoft and Samsung see the device being used in education, financial and professional services, healthcare, hospitality, retail, and manufacturing. Scenarios envisioned include a doctor talking to patients and design teams collaborating. (PhysOrg.com) — Microsoft and Samsung have announced the Microsoft Surface computer, called SUR40, as available for preorder, through the Samsung website, in 23 countries. The unique multi-touch screen is shown in a compact, stylish design as a table top but also can take the form of a vertical wall mount. The product is four inches thin, which makes it easy to use in either type of deployment. On walls, the SU40 can be hung or used any other way in custom enclosures. There are standard legs available for table use or a customer can design and attach their own. The SUR40 release is scheduled for early 2012.Those who attended the CES show his year had the opportunity to see this computing device that is a result of a Microsoft-Samsung collaboration. The first Surface PC was released in 2008. Microsoft promo video One promotional piece describes PixelSense technology as giving LCD panels “the power to see without the use of camera.” Vision-based interaction takes place without cameras; the Individual pixels in the display see what’s touching the screen and that information is immediately processed and interpreted, passing the information on to the application. PixelSense allows a LCD display to recognize fingers, hands, and objects placed on the screen. PixelSense uses 2 million sensors built into the panel.The SUR40 ushers in what Microsoft’s designers envision as a next step in computing, where computer users do not solely depend on desk, chair and conventional PC machine but instead think of work done on “surface computing” which might be a computer screen as table top or computer screen as wall hanging. The SUR40 draw will be for its utility in serving up on its thin display information and ideas. End users are seen as business people and other professionals who need to share information and brainstorm on the fly. The SUR40 can track up to 50 touch points simultaneously. The SUR40 has a 40-inch screen with full high definition 1920×1080 resolution. The device uses an AMD Athlon II X2 Dual-Core Processor 2.9GHz paired with the AMD HD6750M GPU, featuring DirectX 11 support. The key attraction is its use of PixelSense technology, which enables touch recognition. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2011 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Citation: Touchscreen table computer SUR40 starts pre-orders (2011, November 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-touchscreen-table-sur40-pre-orders.html Charles Park, VP at Samsung Electronics, said, “The Samsung SUR40 delivers a unique interactive experience that will significantly change the way companies engage with their customers.” SAMSUNG Electronics Showcases Innovative Display Technology Explore furtherlast_img read more

DNA study shows Neolithic Europeans interbred with Anatolian migrants

first_img Sampling of petrous bone from a human skull. Credit: Balázs G. Mende © 2017 Phys.org Explore further Citation: DNA study shows Neolithic Europeans interbred with Anatolian migrants (2017, November 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-dna-neolithic-europeans-interbred-anatolian.html Middle Neolithic Collective grave of La Mina, Spain, excavation situation Credit: Manolo Rojo Guerra Geographic locations of the samples analyzed in the study “Parallel palaeogenomic transects reveal complex genetic history of early European farmers” with a close-up of Hungary (based on figure 1a-b from Nature, Lipson/Szécsényi-Nagy et al. 2017, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature24476). Credit: Nature, Lipson/Szécsényi-Nagy et al. 2017. More information: Mark Lipson et al. Parallel palaeogenomic transects reveal complex genetic history of early European farmers, Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nature24476AbstractAncient DNA studies have established that Neolithic European populations were descended from Anatolian migrants who received a limited amount of admixture from resident hunter-gatherers. Many open questions remain, however, about the spatial and temporal dynamics of population interactions and admixture during the Neolithic period. Here we investigate the population dynamics of Neolithization across Europe using a high-resolution genome-wide ancient DNA dataset with a total of 180 samples, of which 130 are newly reported here, from the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods of Hungary (6000–2900 BC, n = 100), Germany (5500–3000 BC, n = 42) and Spain (5500–2200 BC, n = 38). We find that genetic diversity was shaped predominantly by local processes, with varied sources and proportions of hunter-gatherer ancestry among the three regions and through time. Admixture between groups with different ancestry profiles was pervasive and resulted in observable population transformation across almost all cultural transitions. Our results shed new light on the ways in which gene flow reshaped European populations throughout the Neolithic period and demonstrate the potential of time-series-based sampling and modelling approaches to elucidate multiple dimensions of historical population interactions.Press release (Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers has found that Neolithic hunter-gatherers living in several parts of Europe interbred with farmers from the Near East. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes comparing DNA from several early groups in Europe and evidence of interbreeding. The researchers found that there was a lot more breeding going on between the two groups than has been thought. They found that as the farmers moved in, interbreeding began almost immediately. It continued for approximately the next several hundred years at all of the sites under study, though the team reports a more rapid pace in Spain and Germany than in Hungary.The researchers note that their findings make sense logically, as well—it would seem far more likely that contact between the two groups would result in interbreeding, rather than one group simply out-reproducing the other to the point that the original group simply disappeared. An Early Neolithic grave from Bátaszék (Hungary), which was also part of the DNA analyses. Credit: Anett Osztás The Neolithic period, often described as the New Stone Age, was a period of human history from approximately 15,000 BCE to 3,000 BCE. It was a time defined by the development of settlements and the refinement of tools and the arts. Prior research has shown that people living in what is now Germany, Hungary and Spain were mostly hunter-gatherers during the early Neolithic period, but were “replaced” by farmers moving in from the Near East (Anatolia). In this new effort, the researchers suggest that interbreeding between the two groups led to the decline of the hunter-gatherers. The end result is that most modern Europeans are descended from the Near East immigrant farmers, but have remnants of hunter-gatherer DNA.To learn more about the early history of humans in Europe, the researchers obtained and analyzed 180 DNA samples of people from early Hungary, Germany and Spain dating from between 6,000 and 2,200 BCE. They used data from the DNA analysis to create a mathematical model, which was used to build a simulation of population interactions in the areas of study. Ancient DNA evidence shows hunter-gatherers and farmers were intimately linked Middle Neolithic Collective grave of La Mina, Spain, excavation situation Credit: Manolo Rojo Guerra Journal information: Nature Cave Els Trocs in the Spanish pyrenees with Early Neolithic burials, discussion between members of the excavation group. Credit: Kurt Werner Alt Geographic locations of the samples analyzed in the study “Parallel palaeogenomic transects reveal complex genetic history of early European farmers” with a close-up of Hungary (based on figure 1a-b from Nature, Lipson/Szécsényi-Nagy et al. 2017, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature24476). Credit: Nature, Lipson/Szécsényi-Nagy et al. 2017. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Altering silkworm genes to cause addition of useful protein into silk production

first_img © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. For many years scientists have strived to improve on the already impressive attributes of silk—some would like to make it stronger, others to produce silk naturally in different colors, while others yet would like to include features such as antibiotic properties. Such efforts have not always been as fruitful as desired, however; thus, research continues. In this new effort, the researchers sought to change the makeup of silk by causing the silkworm to produce and use unnatural proteins.The researchers sought to induce silkworms to produce an amino acid called 4-azido-L-phenylalanine, which the worms would add to the silk they made. The researchers used tRNA synthetase to get their silk-producing organs to create azidophenylalanine and then to accept it as an added ingredient in silk production. They then used a bacterial screening system to weed out the cells that were not receptive to adding the protein as silk was spun. This was followed by the creation of four altered silkworm strains and adding the genes responsible for causing the creation of azidophenylalanine in only the parts of the worm involved in creating the materials for use in spinning silk—allowing it to make its way to other body parts could have led to undesired side-effects. At this point, the team was ready to test their work by allowing the genetically modified worms to spin some silk. Testing of the silk showed that for two of the strains, more than 6 percent of the natural enzyme had been replaced by azidophenylalanine—proof that their technique had worked. The team then demonstrated that adding a protein such as azidophenylalanine could provide a positive function by conjugating the silk produced by the modified silkworms to fluorescent molecules through the use of click chemistry, which caused the cocoons to glow—one bright red, the other green. Explore further Credit: ACS Silkworms fed carbon nanotubes or graphene produce stronger silkcenter_img A team of researchers with the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies and the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, both in Japan, has found a way to alter silkworm genes to create silk with useful proteins. In their paper published in ACS Synthetic Biology, the group describes their technique and suggest possible uses for it. Journal information: ACS Synthetic Biology More information: Hidetoshi Teramoto et al. Genetic Code Expansion of the Silkworm Bombyx mori to Functionalize Silk Fiber, ACS Synthetic Biology (2018). DOI: 10.1021/acssynbio.7b00437AbstractThe genetic code in bacteria and animal cells has been expanded to incorporate novel amino acids into proteins. Recent efforts have enabled genetic code expansion in nematodes, flies, and mice, whereas such engineering is rare with industrially useful animals. In the present study, we engineered the silkworm Bombyx mori to synthesize silk fiber functionalized with azidophenylalanine. For this purpose, we developed a bacterial system to screen for B. mori phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases with altered amino-acid specificity. We created four transgenic B. mori lines expressing the selected synthetase variants in silk glands, and found that two of them supported the efficient in vivo incorporation of azidophenylalanine into silk fiber. The obtained silk was bio-orthogonally reactive with fluorescent molecules. The results showed that genetic code expansion in an industrial animal can be facilitated by prior bacterial selection, to accelerate the development of silk fiber with novel properties. Citation: Altering silkworm genes to cause addition of useful protein into silk production (2018, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-silkworm-genes-addition-protein-silk.htmllast_img read more

KoPT cruise to tour citys landmarks

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Port Trust (KoPT) will start a heritage tour down the Hooghly from April 28. The cruise tour – ‘A Voyage through Tide and Time’ – will be “solely managed” by the port, KoPT chairman Vinit Kumar told PTI.”The KoPT plans to run the service on weekends but it requires a group of at least 20 heads to conduct a tour. The tourism department will help us in promoting and marketing the heritage trip without any exclusive tie-ups,” Kumar told PTI. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe tour will begin from the Maritime Heritage Centre at Old Fairlie Warehouse, where visitors would get a chance to learn about the country’s maritime history.The centre houses maritime documents that date back to the British era.From the heritage centre, the tourists would then be taken to the historic Man-of-War Jetty at Prinsep Ghat to board a cruise vessel.The vessel would pass along the historic ghats, travel upstream to the Koilaghat jetties – an erstwhile berth for foreign ships – touch the Howrah bridge, the Kidderpore Dock lockgates, the BNR House – where Nawab Wajid Ali Shah once resided – and the Suriname Memorial, before ending the journey at the Indenture Memorial and Old Clock Tower site. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe Suriname memorial was built in recognition and remembrance of labourers who set off from Calcutta to work in distant colonies.”The tourists may even get to see ships moving into the port through the lock gates, if the timings match,” Kumar said, adding that there would be guides to explain the importance of the landmarks.The tentative three-hour tour will cost an Indian Rs 1399 while a foreigner will have to shell out Rs 2499.last_img read more

JU defers English admission test to July 23

first_imgKolkata: Jadavpur University has decided to defer its admission test in English scheduled to be held on July 21 to July 23.It may be mentioned that Trinamool Congress will be observing the Martyr’s Day rally on July 21 and a huge number of people are expected to attend the rally, resulting in choking of public transport. So, the university authorities have decided to push back the dates so that those appearing for the test face no difficulty. The changed date will be notified on the varsity’s website on Monday. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”The English written test will be held from 3 pm to 5 pm on July 23, instead of 12 noon to 2 pm on July 21. The Bengali test is scheduled from 12 noon to 2 pm on the same day,” a source in the university said. JU authorities, in the Executive Committee meeting held on Tuesday, decided that admission tests will be held in six Humanities subject in the undergraduate level- that includes Bengali, English, History, Philosophy, International Relations and Comparative Literature. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPIt was last Wednesday when the varsity had notified that entrance tests in the six subjects will be held from July 21 to 25 and the final merit list for admission will be prepared on the basis of 50 percent of the total marks secured in HS or equivalent examination and 50 percent of the marks secured in admission tests. Majority of the students of the university had agitated pressing for their demand to bring back admission tests. The EC had earlier decided to scrap admission tests for these subjects.last_img read more

Kidney transplants at SSKM One patient critical

first_imgKolkata: Moumita Chakraborty, one of the two patients, who had a kidney transplant on early Saturday morning, is stated to be critical. She has been kept under ventilation as her condition deteriorated following the surgery.Two kidneys were extracted from a 15-year-old, Mallika Majumdar, who was declared brain dead by SSKM Hospital on Friday morning. A resident of Siliguri, Majumdar was admitted to SSKM Hospital with infection in one of her ears.The family members of the victim were urged to donate her organs to others. After counselling, her family members agreed to donate her organs. According to hospital sources, the infection soon spread to her brain. One kidney was transplanted in Chakraborty, while the other was in Sanjib Das. The surgeries were conducted by the doctors at SSKM Hospital on early Saturday morning. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to SSKM Hospital authorities, another recipient of kidney, Das has been recovering. He has also been kept under observation. Both Chakraborty and Das are residents of North 24-Parganas.Two separate groups comprising three doctors in each conducted the transplants on the patients in two different operation theaters.The operations continued till 7 am on Saturday.The retina of the brain dead victim has been kept at the hospital, while her skin will be preserved at the skin bank of the hospital.last_img read more

State to hold review meeting on Centresponsored schemes

first_imgKolkata: The state government will hold a meeting to review the present status of the Central government sponsored schemes.This comes at a time when Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had repeatedly raised the issue of the Centre’s step motherly attitude towards Bengal.It may be mentioned that there will be discussions on issues including the fund raised by the Centre for the projects. At the same time, there will also be discussions on allocation of funds for different schemes and their utilisation. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeRepresentatives of around 30 departments will be present at the meeting. Mainly, nodal officers of the schemes and financial advisors of the departments will be present at the meeting convened by the state Finance Department on September 7. Meanwhile, the state Public Works Department (PWD) directed its engineers to upload all project related data on the Samiksha Portal. The move is a step ahead towards a better implementation of e-governance system. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedIn a notice issued ahead of a meeting to review the progress of the ongoing projects, direction has been given to ensure that the ‘status of work’ gets uploaded on Samiksha Portal of the state PWD.All the executive engineers are requested to update the status of work on the portal well in advance before attendingthe meeting.At the same time, they have to submit the report following a specific format as prescribed by the department.It may be mentioned that Samiksha is an exclusive portal of the department that acts as an online-based project monitoring system. An officer can get current status of the ongoing projects after logging into the portal using his or her login ID.The portal has made the task of tracking the progress of a project easy.”But to ensure that correct and current information about a project is available on the portal, the concerned engineer or the official needs to upload the status report timely,” said a senior official of the state PWD.This time direction has been given to upload the status report of a project much ahead of the review meeting in which Chief Engineers, Superintendent Engineers and executive engineers of all the directorates and sectors of the department will be present. The meeting is scheduled to be held on September 9 at Nabanna Sabhaghar.According to another official of the state PWD, the discussions in the meeting will be more fruitful if the senior officials and engineers of the department remain well aware about the present status of a project in advance before attending the meeting.”Hence, the executive engineers have been asked to upload status reports of all the projects on the Samiksha Portal well in advance,” the official said.last_img read more

Memorabilia of music maestros

first_imgMusic expresses all emotions and acts the mediator between the spiritual and the sensual life. In order to present a collection of candid shots of musicians in the form a literary piece, Padma Shri Shobha Deepak Singh has compiled a rare anthology of 250 photographs of the great Indian music maestros, emoting the multiple emotions of Indian music through her coffee table book titled Musicscapes. Musicscapes, which follows close on the heels of Shobha Deepak Singh’s Theatrescapes (2014) and Dancescapes (2013), becomes a homage to her deepest and most long engaging love-music. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Musicscapes published by Roli Books, was launched by Sheila Dixit and Shekhar Sen, Chairman, Sangeet Natak Akademi, at Visual Arts Gallery, India Habitat Centre on April 8. An exhibition of 60 photographs of the country’s music luminaries, which has been put up by the curatorial expertise of Dr Alka Pande, will be on till April 14 in the national Capital.Shobha Deepak Singh said, “Classical music liberates me and it leads me to a state where I feel I am truly elevated. What classical music does best and continues to do is to show a kind of transformation of moods, to show a very wide psychological voyage.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“When I did my first two books, I thought I covered the canvas of emotion and motion. But as I looked through many of these photos, I realised that there was so much unsung emotion that needs to be felt by others too. The book helps to accomplish that.” Dr Alka Pande, the illustrious curator of the exhibition said, “The book is a compilation of all those great artists who have contributed magnificently to the vocal and instrumental musicscape of India. This is a survey of Shobha’s work as she captures moments, iconic and unusual, rubbing shoulders with the greats.”last_img read more

Panorama12 Bringing contemporary issues to forefront

first_imgThe colours, shapes, and emotion have emerged from the very soul of the Capital and together they will converge at Open Palm Court Gallery, IHC, Lodhi Road this autumn. As a part of a group exhibition titled ‘Panorama-12′, over 20 artists will bring to the viewers a varying range of interpretation of ranging contemporary issues of social relevance from. The art show will be held from September 1 – 6.Curated by Priyanka Banerjee, Panorama-12 -literally meaning an unbroken view of a subject, celebrates the talent of the fresh and the new, and makes a compelling case for contemporary art in the city. The exhibition delves into the contemporary issue of social relevance, such as feminism, the ethical treatment of animals, spiritual harmony, global warming and so on. Nature, for instance, is explored through a mutually symbiotic relationship of flora and fauna. Urbanization and industrialization have exploited the natural layers of our ecosystem, and its awareness becomes paramount to awaken our collective consciousness. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDabbling in a diverse range of mediums, from watercolour, oil and pen and pencils to mixed media, the artists bring to their canvas emotions that reverberate with social significance.Mridul Chakraborty depicts the joy of festivity through his portrayal of human figures. Nilay Sarkar reverberates the same mood and shows happiness through vibrant and soft colours used on his canvas. Tapan Das harps on his love for nature through his abstract art. Meghna emphasises on the adverse effects of global warming through her vivacious paintings. Urbanization has led to the destruction of forest thus shrinking the natural habitats of some of the species pushing them on the verge of extinction. This thought-provoking issue has been beautifully portrayed by Meghna. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveShalini Varshney’s paintings portray spiritual harmony which is lost in our lives. Biswarajan Bhunia’s paintings resonate the same feelings of Shalini’. The bright colours used, bold and graceful brush strokes make his paintings vivacious. Rama Sharma and Pooja Gujral have tried to bring colours and happiness into our stressful lives through their artworks. Rajeev Semwal has tried to bring the songs of nature woven neatly through his traditional artworks. Veteran artist Uma Bardhan deals with spirituality while the artworks of Archana Das are an impeccable blend of childlike innocence and adult wisdom.last_img read more

Mary Kom named brand ambassador of Tribes India

first_imgThe Ministry of Tribal Affairs recently launched the ‘Punch Tantra’ collection to promote tribal artefacts and named world boxing champion Mary Kom as the brand ambassador of ‘Tribes India’ – an initiative to promote tribal artefacts.The Punch Tantra range promoted by the Tribal Cooperative Marketing Development Federation of India (TRIFED) includes handlooms and handicrafts which will be promoted by Kom. The event was graced by the Minister of State for Tribal Affairs Jaswantsinh Sumanbhai Bhabhor, Deepak Khandekar, Secretary (Tribal affairs) and the Managing Director Pravir Krishna. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDuring the launch function, Mary Kom said, such initiatives would bring a great change in the lives of the tribal people, socially and economically.Tribal Affairs Minister Jual Oram said that the probable potential of TRIFED was much more than many other public sector units and if utilised properly, it may become a game changer in the Indian economy.Union Minister for Tribal Affairs commended the efforts of TRIFED for promoting tribal products through the network of Tribes India Showrooms, Aadi Mahotsavs/exhibitions and various e-commerce platforms namely, Amazon, Flipkart, Snapdeal and GeM which provide a window to national and international markets. TRIFED achieved a record sale of Rupees 20 crores during the last year and Rupees 7.83 crores during current financial year till August 2018, which is an increase of 109% over the sales made in the corresponding period during the last Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivefinancial year.Minister also informed about the Minimum Support Price and Value Addition Scheme titled “Vandhan” for Minor Forest Produces which has now been extended to all states and under which value addition has been given high priority.The Minister of State for Tribal affairs Jaswantsinh Sumanbhai Bhabhor commended the efforts of team TRIFED, who have during last year achieved milestones in terms of purchase, sales, MSP for MFPs and Vandhan.The Secretary, Tribal Affairs stated that the TRIFED needs to strengthen these institutional arrangements and continue to work for the betterment of tribal artisans.The Managing Director, TRIFED, Pravir Krishna extended vote of thanks and assured that all out efforts shall be made for increasing livelihood opportunities of tribal artisans and tribal entrepreneurs across the country.last_img read more