Brand South Africa calls on patriots to support an authentic South African story #Matwetwe

first_imgBrand South Africa’s mission is to encourage citizens to find opportunities that promote Nation Brand pride and patriotism. The importance of a patriotic society results in a strengthened Nation Brand image and competitiveness.This is why South African multi award-winning record producer DJ Black Coffee in partnership with stand-up comedian, actor and writer Kagiso Lediga are bringing to the cinemas, their highly anticipated film MATWETWE (WIZARD) from Friday, 25th January 2019.MATWETWE is a coming of age adventure following Lefa (Sibusiso Khwinana) and Papi (Tebatso Mashishi), best friends and recent high school graduates, as they hustle through their young lives. Over the course of an action-packed New Years Eve in the iconic township of Atteridgeville, the boys try to score a huge deal, dodge a kingpin gangster and his violent minions, get the girl and ultimately save their lives in this hilarious escapade.The South African film industry has had a positive  impact on the economy, as confirmed by The National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) in its Economic Impact Assessment study. The film industry had a R5.4 billion contribution to the GDP, compared to the R3.5 billion in 2013.Brand South Africa calls on citizens to go out in their numbers to support this local production at the more than 800 cinemas across the country in support of this authentic South African story filled with adventure and comedy. #MatwetweWatch the trailer Matwetwe (Wizard)last_img read more

Olympus Announces OM-D E-M5 Mark II Camera, 5-Axis Stabilization with 60p Video

first_img  Sensitivity Range  200-3200, High Sensitivity Mode up to 25600   Crop Factor  x2   Battery  BLN-1 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II Product TourOlympus has created the following product tour showing off a few of the cameras new features.Cinematic ExamplesOlympus has created a few example videos showing the E-M5 Mark II in-action.In this first example Olympus shows us how the Mark II can be used to get cinematic looks. It’s hard to get a great understanding of the video quality due to the harsh color grade, but we would be wrong to say that the footage doesn’t look cinematic.Director of Photography John Brawley has created a beautiful lifestyle video showing the Mark II’s video potential. The majority of this film was shot handheld.Here is a behind-the-scenes video of that shoot. If you’re short on time skip to the end of the video where John shows us what the ungraded video looks like, and how much of a difference the 5-axis stabilizer makes on shooting video.This video shot by Markus Kontiainen and Janne Amunét features the Mark II in cold weather. The footage is pretty darn impressive all around.Perhaps the most facinating example of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II in action is this film shot by Edmond Terakopian. The film is a documentary featuring a London Taxi driver. It’s also a great example of the 5-axis stabilizer in action. Some of the shots in this film were shot handheld in a car, but from the smooth stabilization you would have thought they were shot using a track dolly.Pricing and AvailabilityThe Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II will be available in March for a price of $1,099.What do you think of this new camera? Will it be a revolutionary product for 2015?Share in the comments below.   Burst Shooting  10 fps   Storage Media  SD, SDHC, SDXC   Display Screen  3.0″ OLED Flip-Out Touch-Screen Olympus’s latest camera announcement might be a game-changer for video professionals and photographers alike.Every spring camera companies announce new products in the run up to April’s National Association of Broadcasters Show (NAB). We’re in the middle of this wonderful season and Olympus is kicking it off with their latest camera announcement….The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark IIThere are a number of cool features to get excited about with this camera, but by far the most exciting is 5-axis sensor stabilization. Unlike optical stabilization, sensor stabilization takes place on the inside of the lens. The sensor will move to compensate for any camera sake.This isn’t the first time we’ve seen 5-axis stabilization. This revolutionary technology was first unveiled by Sony with their A7II, but the difference with this Olympus announcement is that the E-M5 uses a Micro Four-Third lens mount. As you may already know, Micro Four Thirds mounts can be adapted to accept a lot of different lenses, many more than a traditional DSLR. So instead of having to purchase really expensive lenses, users can use lens adapters with older lenses on a Micro Four-Thirds mount.The 5-axis sensor stabilization will add 5 stops of stabilization to the image.The E-M5 Mark II is equipped to shoot photos and video. Avaliable frame rates include  60, 50, 30, 25, and 24 frames per second. This is due to the improved IPM and AII-I compression formats.The camera also comes with a focus peaking function, meaning the camera will tell you if the image is in focus or not. However, it should be noted that when using the HDMI 4:2:2 output the focus peaking will be disabled.This camera can accept 1/8” microphone inputs which can be used with hotshoe microphones, like the Rode video mic. Users can change the audio levels during the middle of recording for both the on-camera mic and an external mic. However, there is not audio monitoring output on this camera. If you want to monitor sound on the E-M5 Mark II you will have to buy a separate hotshoe adapter or simply use an external recorder.Video aside, the Mark II is a very impressive camera when it comes to photography. The 16 megapixel sensor can actually process an ‘image’ up to 40MP. You read that right, a 16MP camera can shoot a 40MP image. In short, this process works by shooting a series of images across a one second span of time. The camera then stitches the images together to create a larger image.Other notable features include 10 fps burst shooting mode, built-in WiFi, and a 3.0” flip-out touch screen OLED monitor. The E-M5 Mark II is also the first Olympus camera to feature timecode information.Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II Specs   Shutter Speed  1/8000 to 60 Seconds   Lens Mount  Micro 4/3   Image Stabilization  5-Axis Stabilization   Video  1080p: 60, 50, 30, 25, & 24 fps   Flash  None   Viewfinder  Electronic, 2360k-Dot   Sensor  16MP Live MOS Sensor   Video Output  4:2:2 1080p HDMI Output   Autofocus  Yeslast_img read more

Six of 7 minor girls missing from Bihar shelter home found

first_imgSix of seven minor girls who had gone missing from a government-funded shelter home in Mokama in Patna district in the early hours of Saturday were found from Darbhanga in the evening, police confirmed.The girls were recovered by the Special Investigation Team of police led by Assistant Superintendent of Police Lipi Singh. “Arrangements are being made to bring back the girls from Darbhanga. More details will be known after they reach here,” said a police officer in Mokama. The seventh missing girl has been traced as well but she is yet to be rescued, the officer added.Five of the missing girls are witnesses in the Muzaffarpur sexual assault case. A police team had been formed to locate the girls.“The girls escaped from the shelter home between 3 and 3.30 a.m. on Saturday,” State’s Social Welfare director Raj Kumar had said earlier in the day.Patna District Magistrate Kumar Ravi had also visited the shelter home run by Nazareth Hospital Society, Mokama, from its premises.Window grill cut The iron grill of a window in a bathroom of the shelter home was found cut. However, it was not clear whether the girls escaped using that as the gap was “too narrow”, police said. The State police headquarters had alerted all police stations and railway police units to be on the lookout for the missing girls.last_img read more

Are SixMan Rotations Ever Worth It

Noah Syndergaard, the New York Mets’ phenomenal young starting pitcher, throws 99 mph fastballs and hits home runs to straight center field. Dillon Gee, the guy Syndergaard replaced in the rotation in May, does not do those things. After a trip to the disabled list, Gee is back, but the Mets couldn’t just send a rookie nicknamed Thor back down to the minors. They also couldn’t keep Gee, a perfectly solid back-of-the-rotation pitcher, there either.So, flush with pitching talent, the Mets are trying something novel: They are deploying a six-man rotation. It might just be a brilliant way to safeguard the health of their pitchers.Earlier this year, sabermetrician Russell Carleton wrote that six-man rotations offer few obvious benefits in terms of pitching performance: The extra day of rest doesn’t seem to increase pitcher strikeout rates or reduce walk rates. And, because the extra man entails splitting up the workload among a larger group of people, it tends to dilute the effect of truly great starting pitchers. Over a full season, a six-man rotation results in about 30-50 fewer innings per starter. For a top-heavy Mets rotation that can send Matt Harvey and Noah Syndergaard to the mound, reducing their workload appears costly and counterintuitive.1Carleton estimates a team’s cost of this reduced workload, for an average No. 1 starter, at about 1.6 wins (and Harvey might be better than an average No. 1 starter).If there is a potential benefit of a six-man rotation, then, it must be its health effects. And the Mets could use some preventive medicine. As others have noted, the number of pitchers with elbow injuries has spiked.2Even so, the epidemic is not as bad as it seems. The injury concern goes double for the Mets, whose rotation relies on a recently recovered Harvey, 42-year-old Bartolo Colón and fresh-off-the-DL Gee. (The Mets also saw another young pitcher, Zack Wheeler, undergo Tommy John surgery this year.) Since the greatest predictor of future pitcher injury is previous injury, the Mets are in a precarious position.Previous attempts to figure out whether six-man rotations help pitchers’ health haven’t suggested much of a connection. When Carleton did it, he couldn’t find any benefit, but he looked over a long timeframe (going all the way to the 1950s). Because we have detailed injury data going back only about 10 years, Carleton had to use a model that incorporated both injuries and other factors that might remove a pitcher from the rotation (such as poor performance). Accordingly, Carleton found only a modest effect on injury probability for starters going on three days’ rest, and only in the past couple of decades.On the other hand, Eno Sarris pointed out that six-man rotations are standard in Japan’s highest professional league, and the rate of Tommy John surgeries is much lower there. This lower rate exists despite a similarly abusive3Or perhaps even worse than abusive schedule for young pitchers. Furthering Sarris’s point, Yu Darvish, the Texas Rangers ace and recent victim of elbow surgery, argued that such a change might reduce wear and tear on the arm. Nevertheless, there are many distinctions between Japanese professional baseball and MLB, and it’s hard to confidently pin the responsibility for fewer injuries on the rotation strategy alone.I took a more direct look, using injury information accrued by Baseball Prospectus (specifically, Corey Dawkins) from 2006 through 2014. Over this period, starting pitchers have been primarily used in a five-man rotation, usually getting 4.2 to 4.5 days of rest, on average, over the course of a year. As a result, we need to look at individual pitcher outings to see some evidence of an injury-prevention effect. By linking the injury data with the time between starts of every pitcher,4Using data from Retrosheet we can get an idea about whether a six-man rotation would help reduce injury risk.I found that there is a strong link between rest and injury rates. Looking at starts on three days of rest, 1.7 percent of pitchers suffered a reported injury within the next two weeks.5These results hold for time windows going out to about 60 days, after which the correlation between rest and injury rates trails off. At four days of rest, the typical amount in the modern age, that number drops precipitously to 1.0 percent. (Maybe that helps explain why the five-man rotation came to be.) Then the injury risk falls even further: at five days of rest — which would be standard for a six-man rotation — just 0.8 percent of pitchers are injured in the next 14 days, for a 20 percent decrease compared with four days of rest. That is a potentially meaningful drop in injury risk.6The difference in injury probability over two weeks hovers right at the edge of statistical significance (p=.06, using a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test), partially because the probability of an injury occurring over any two-week span is quite low. If you extend the test to consider longer time windows (such as 21 days), the p-value drops below .05.Despite the drop in injury risk, when injuries were suffered, they were no more severe for pitchers operating on short rest. On either four or five days’ rest, pitchers lost a median of about 21 days of time.7There were too few injuries after three days’ rest to make any comparison meaningful. So more rest may prevent injuries, but injuries on shorter rest are no worse when they do happen.There are still potential issues of correlation and causation. Managers might change usage patterns for pitchers depending on their injury risks. Alternatively, injury risk could be correlated with some other factor that dictates usage patterns. Furthermore, though the additional day of rest seems to reduce short-term injury risk, there’s no guarantee that it would work as well in the long term — perhaps more rest merely delays the inevitable.8You might expect this scenario if pitcher injury results primarily from the progressive buildup of damage in the ligaments of the arm. If that’s the case, you can delay the date of injury by reducing the frequency of starts and the workload, but you can’t really prevent it from happening.Even if you accept that longer rest periods lead to fewer injuries, it’s difficult to come to any hard and fast conclusions regarding the optimal strategy. Although it appears that starting with more rest is correlated with a lower injury probability, the benefit that might be gained will be different for every team and every rotation. Top-heavy rotations that deploy a Cy Young candidate will suffer from seeing their excellent pitcher throw fewer innings, but at the same time, they may be guarding against that pitcher’s suffering an untimely injury (at least in the short term).This is the situation in which the Mets find themselves. With Harvey anchored as a dominant starter who’s also recovering from a dangerous injury, the reward (potentially reducing his risk of relapse) could outweigh the risk (losing some of his innings in the near term). And, as noted above, Harvey is not the only injury risk on the staff.Regardless of whether the six-man rotation is a good idea for other teams, it seems to fit the Mets and their injury-prone rotation. The question now becomes whether their slick strategy will come to cost them a win or two, as Harvey or Syndergaard gives way to the less-talented Gee. Perched on the edge of playoff contention this year, but with a still-brighter future ahead, the Mets must carefully balance the reduced risk of injury with the possibility of a surprise October run. read more

President Trump Gets A Head Start On Shaping The Federal Courts

first_img Share Mark Wilson/Getty ImagesPresident Trump has a large number of judicial vacancies to fill, since Senate Republicans held up President Barack Obama’s nominees.President Trump is moving quickly to put his personal stamp on the federal courts.On Monday the president nominated 10 people for federal judgeships. Thanks to an unusually large number of vacancies on the bench, there could be many more to come.“This is just a down payment,” said John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation. He noted there are more than 100 open seats on the federal district courts and appeals courts.“Starting with a Supreme Court vacancy, which has now been filed, President Trump certainly has a very good opportunity early on to have an impact on the federal bench,” Malcolm said.Indeed, Trump came into office with a chance to fill more than twice as many court vacancies as President Barack Obama had. That’s partly because for the last two years, the Republican-controlled Senate dragged its feet in confirming judges. The Senate confirmed only 20 of Obama’s judicial nominees during 2015 and 2016, less than a third the number that were confirmed in the last two years of the Reagan, Clinton and George W. Bush administrations.“Just as they held the Merrick Garland seat open on the Supreme Court, they also held open an awful lot of vacancies on the district courts and the courts of appeals,” said Russell Wheeler, who tracks judicial nominations at the Brookings Institution.At last month’s swearing-in ceremony for Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, Trump acknowledged that Senate stonewalling had given him a rare opportunity.“I especially want to express our gratitude to [Senate Republican Leader] Mitch McConnell for all that he did to make this achievement possible,” Trump said. “So thank you, Mitch.”The Heritage Foundation’s Malcolm cautions it wasn’t a risk-free strategy. Had Hillary Clinton won the election, she might now be packing the courts with a slate of more liberal judges.“So it took some guts and some daring on behalf of Sen. McConnell, and it paid off,” Malcolm said.Trump campaigned on the promise that he would appoint conservative judges to the bench — a key selling point for many Republican voters. He even released a list of potential candidates for the Supreme Court, which Malcolm and the Heritage Foundation had a hand in crafting.Two of the nominees announced Monday — Joan Larsen of the Michigan Supreme Court and David Stras of the Minnesota Supreme Court — are drawn from that list. Larsen was nominated to a seat on the federal appeals court in Cincinnati while Stras was tapped for the appellate court in St. Louis.All of the nominees appear to be cut from similar judicial cloth.“They are all highly regarded in conservative legal circles and by practitioners in the states where they reside,” Malcolm said.All presidents leave a mark on the courts, especially if they serve for two terms. But with so many early vacancies, Trump has a chance to accelerate his impact, quickly chipping away at the narrow Democratic advantage that Obama left on the federal bench.Wheeler says 51 percent of the current judges were appointed by Democrats, up from 36 percent on the appellate courts and 40 percent on the district courts when Obama took office.Partisan pedigree is not always predictive of how judges will rule. The Seattle judge who blocked Trump’s original travel ban, for example, is a George W. Bush appointee. But Trump has made no secret of the kind of judicial philosophy he’s looking for.“We can assume the Trump administration is going to continue to nominate judges, especially for courts of appeals, who have fairly strong conservative credentials,” Wheeler said. “A big variable is whether or not Democratic senators can put a brake on it.”Senate Democrats gave up the right to filibuster nominees for the lower courts. But there is still a tradition that nominees should not be confirmed over the objection of their home-state senator. Democratic senators from Michigan and Minnesota have promised to give close scrutiny to the nominations of Larsen and Stras, assuming that genteel tradition survives in today’s more rough-and-tumble Senate.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

React Native 057 coming soon with new iOS WebViews

first_imgWebView is used to display web content in your iOS applications.Yesterday, React Native announced a new native iOS backend to the WebView component that uses WKWebView. This WebView component will be available in the upcoming React Native 0.57 release. Apple has discouraged the use of UIWebViews for a long time. This is due to its being formally deprecated in the upcoming months. It is advised that you use the WKWebView class instead of using UIWebView for the apps that run in iOS 8 and above. You can use the useWebKit property to opt into this implementation: What problems does WKWebView solve? Earlier, to embed web content in our applications we had two options, UIWebView and WKWebView. UIWebView is the original WebView introduced in 2.0. It is known to have some pitfalls and problems. The main drawback is that it has no legitimate way to facilitate communication between the JavaScript running in the WebView and React Native. The newly introduced WKWebView aims to solve this problem. Other benefits of WKWebView over UIWebView include faster JavaScript execution and a multi-process architecture. What to consider when switching to WKWebView? You must avoid using the following properties, for the time being: Using automaticallyAdjustContentInsets and contentInsets may result in inconsistent behavior. When we add contentInsets to UIWebView, the viewport size changes (gets smaller, if the content insets are positive). In case of WKWebView, the viewport size remain unchanged. If you use the backgroundColor property there is a chance that WKWebView may render transparent backgrounds differently from UIWebView and can also flicker into view. Per React Native community, WKWebView doesn’t support the scalesPageToFit property. Hence, they couldn’t implement this on the WebView React Native component. To know more about the new WebViews, check out their announcement on React Native’s official website and their GitHub repository. Read Next Apple releases iOS 12 beta 2 with screen time and battery usage updates among others React Native 0.56 is now available Apple releases iOS 11.4 update with features including AirPlay 2, and HomePod among otherslast_img read more