Russia trying to reform – IAAF task force

first_imgMOSCOW (AP):Russia is making efforts to reform after its damaging doping scandal, according to the head of the IAAF taskforce set up to determine whether the country’s ban from global track and field should be lifted.”The Russians have recognised that there is an issue, a problem, and they are trying to fix it,” Norwegian anti-doping expert Rune Andersen told The Associated Press yesterday.Russia was suspended by the IAAF – track and field’s world governing body – from international competition, including the Olympics, in November after a report by a World Anti-Doping Agency panel detailed a state-sponsored doping programme.Andersen, who heads the five-person IAAF taskforce, held meetings Monday and yesterday in Moscow with Russian government and sports officials.”There is an open and frank discussion,” he said. “There are no obstructions to what we’re trying to do. Everyone wants to find solutions to the problems that Russian athletics has had today.”Andersen added that “several” more meetings are planned with “our Russian friends” before the taskforce reports back to the International Association of Athletics Federations in March.In order for Russia to be readmitted in time for this year’s Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the IAAF has said the country must investigate doping cases, remove officials or coaches who were involved in drug use or cover-ups and establish “a strong anti-doping culture”.The Russian athletics federation is due to elect a new president Saturday as part of its own reform programme. The front-runner is long-time general secretary Mikhail Butov, who also sits on the IAAF’s ruling council.”We have talked about the structure, that’s part of the verification criteria; and of course, that will be part of the discussion when we move on to this,” Andersen told the AP.last_img read more

Rep Chatfield announces April office hours

first_img State Rep. Lee Chatfield invites residents of the 107th House District to join him during local office hours throughout the month of April.“Since taking office, I have conducted monthly office hours in every county I represent,” said Rep. Chatfield, R-Levering. “I believe government needs to be more accountable, and that starts by being accessible, listening to people’s concerns and answering their questions.”His office hours schedule is:Friday, April 24thEmmet CountyJulienne Tomatoes421 Howard St. in Petoskey9-10:30 a.m.Cheboygan CountyDixie Saloon Restaurant401 E. Central Ave. in Mackinaw City2-3:30 p.m.Monday, April 27thChippewa CountyPenny’s Kitchen112 Spruce St. in Sault Ste. Marie9-10:30 a.m.Mackinac CountyDriftwood Restaurant590 N. State St. in St. Ignace2-3:30 p.m.No appointment is necessary and there is no cost to attend. Anyone unable to attend may contact Rep. Chatfield’s office by calling (517) 373-2629, via email at leechatfield@house.mi.gov or through his website at www.RepChatfield.com. Categories: Chatfield News 07Apr Rep. Chatfield announces April office hourslast_img read more

Michigan House approves Rep Steve Johnsons plan helping those wrongfully convicted of

first_img Categories: News,Steven Johnson News The Michigan House today unanimously approved state Rep. Steve Johnson’s plan to ensure those who have been exonerated of a crime would receive the compensation due to them from the state.Johnson’s plan would benefit exonerated Michiganders such as Richard Phillips – who spent more than 45 years in prison after a wrongful conviction, then returned to society with no support system to help him get back on his feet. Dozens of other Michigan residents could be in similar situations because the state’s fund for compensating wrongfully convicted individuals is about out of money.“The fund is essentially bankrupt, and we have an obligation to ensure people like Richard Phillips receive the compensation they are lawfully due,” Johnson, of Wayland, said after the House approved his plan to add $10 million to the fund. “I am glad to see the bipartisan support needed to right this wrong and ensure this fund has reliable, adequate funding well into the future.”In 2016, the Michigan Wrongful Compensation Act was signed into law. The fund is supposed to award an individual exonerated of a wrongful conviction with $50,000 for each year unjustly spent in prison. But the fund currently has less than $500,000, which will likely be totally depleted upon the first few claims by exonerated prisoners.Phillips is awaiting an expected payment from the state after serving time for a murder he didn’t commit. Wayne County officials dismissed charges against him in 2018.The 72-year-old has sold artwork and scrambled to stay afloat financially after decades in prison.“After 47 years, everything was gone. I didn’t even have identification,” Phillips told the House Appropriations Committee recently. “And then I didn’t have any support. So when I got out…I pretty much had to go it alone. I hadn’t done anything wrong to deserve that kind of treatment. I was a citizen, just like any of you. So don’t think that it can’t happen to anybody – because it can. I’ve lived through it.”Johnson’s bill directs $10 million from the general fund to cover the Michigan Wrongful Imprisonment Fund shortfall until next year’s budget is finalized. The measure also ensures that the Legislature receives regular reports about pending claims and the balance of the fund to prevent future shortfalls.House Bill 4286 advances to the Senate for further consideration. 12Mar Michigan House approves Rep. Steve Johnson’s plan helping those wrongfully convicted of crimescenter_img ###last_img read more

Finnish service provider DNA has become one of the

first_imgFinnish service provider DNA has become one of the first cable operators to make a 4K ultra HD service available on its network.DNA is broadcasting the Eutelsat Hot Bird 4K1 demonstration channel in test mode, with the broadcast content viewable by visitors to Helsinki’s Samsung Experience Store on a Samsung curved UHD TV.The demo channel is encoded in HEVC format.last_img